Supremum and infimum – Serlo

Aus Wikibooks
Zur Navigation springen Zur Suche springen
UnderCon icon.svg

Diese Seite ist noch im Entstehen und noch nicht offizieller Bestandteil des Buchs. Gib der Autorin / dem Autor Zeit, die Seite anzupassen!

Introduction[Bearbeiten]

Supremum (from Latin „supremum“ = "the highest/supreme“) sounds, as if it were "the maximum“ (that is, the largest element of the set). In the course of the article, however, we will see that the supremum generalzes the maximum. Let's start by remembering the following:

Every maximum is a supremum, but not every supremum is a maximum.

While the maximum has to be an element of a considered set, this need not apply to the supremum. Therefore we should aptly translate "supremum“ as "the number immediately restricting from the top“. It is "restricting from the top“, because it is like the maximum greater than or equal to any number of the set. And it is "immediate" because it is the smallest of all "upward limiting numbers".

Similarly, the infimum is a generalization of the minimum. It is the "number that immediately restricts downwards", i.e. the largest of all the "numbers that restrict downwards" of a set. We will get to know concrete examples in the coming sections.

For us the concept of the supremum is important, because with it the completeness of the real numbers can be described alternatively. In addition, the supremum is a useful tool in proofs or in defining new terms.

Explanation of the supremum[Bearbeiten]

To explain the Supremum, we will examine how to arrive at its precise definition. For this we will determine how the supremum can be generalized from the maximum. Remember: the maximum of a set is its largest element. The maximum of a quantity has the following properties:

  • is an element of .
  • For every is .

In the second property there is therefore a smaller-equal and no smaller sign, because in the statement could also be equal to . For finite quantities, the maximum is always defined, but this is not necessarily the case for infinite quantities.

First of all, we may encounter the problem that the set under consideration is unlimited upwards. Take for example the set . This set cannot have a maximum or the like, since there is a larger number of for each real number. This set cannot have a largest element. There is also no element that could be "directly the largest" element. Therefore, a question about this with this set simply does not make sense.

For the transfer of the term "maximum" to infinite sets, the set must therefore be limited upwards. So there must be a number , which is greater than or equal to each element of the set. As a result does not necessarily have to be an element of the set.

The set .

But even then problems can still arise. Take for example the set . This set is limited to the top, because for any number greater than can be selected.

Does the quantity have a maximum? Unfortunately not. For each is another number from with property (the number is in the middle between and ). However, cannot have a maximum element, because for each number from there is at least one larger number from .

Thus, when looking at infinite quantities, the maximum loses one property. Namely, that it is element of the set[1]:

  • m is an element of M.
  • For every is .
A set with upper and lower bounds drwan in

The only property that remains is that the number you are looking for is greater than any element in the set. Such a number is called the "upper limit" of the set:

Definition (upper bound)

Let be a subset of . Then a number , which is greater than or equal to each element of , is called an upper bound. So it is for all .

Similarly, a lower bound is a number that limits a quantity downwards:

Definition (Lower bound)

Let be a subset of . Then a number , which is less than or equal to any element of , is called a lower bound. So it is for all .

When we look at our new definition, we see two things. First: Upper and lower limits do not have to be elements of the considered set, because this is not required by the definition. And secondly: the definition says nothing about a possible uniqueness of the bounds.

For example, consider the set . Here we certainly first think of as the upper bound. However, is also an upper bound and meets the requirements of the definition. Apart from the fact that is far above our example set, both numbers are not elements of the set. This example shows that there can be more than one upper bound. But it becomes even more disturbing: A limited subset of the real numbers always has infinitely many upper bounds. If is an upper bound of , any larger number, i.e. for all , is also an upper bound.

On closer inspection, the terms upper and lower bound are not very appropriate. They provide much less than a maximum term. The maximum is always unique: there can only be one of them. That is not the case with the upper bound. Let us therefore try to improve the concept.

On closer inspection, the terms upper and lower bound are not very accurate. They provide much less than a maximum term. The maximum is always unique: there can only be one of them. That is not the case with the upper barrier. Let us therefore try to improve the concept.

Consider as an example again the set . Which number could be used to generalize the maximum for ? Intuitively the number occurs to us. But why choose this number?

We want a general term that works even when the set is no longer so clearly described. Therefore, all upper limits of , i.e. all numbers greater than or equal to , are possible. Now our number should be optimal in the sense that it is as small as possible. So we get to the number . It is not only an upper bound, it is also the smallest upper bound of . We have already seen that for each there is another number with (namely ). Thus no number smaller than can be an upper bound of . is what we consider to be the "immediately above" number of .

Question: What might a set look like where it is not intuitively "clear" what number the Supremum could be?

The Mandelbrot set

Let's briefly have a look at this beautiful looking set of numbers: The Mandelbrot set. They are obtained by inserting all points in a two-dimensional coordinate system into a certain function . It takes a coordinate and turns it into another coordinate . This result is put back into this function and then again and again and again and again.... The coordinates you get with every step become very large for some starting points very fast, for others they remain small. Once the coordinates have moved far enough away from their starting point (have exceeded a limit ), they never come back and "run for it". If a point for the start value always remains below , the point belongs to the set and is colored black. If it exceeds , it gets a certain color, depending on when it exceeded . What we see on the right is the resulting image.

The Mandelbrot set is now in the plane, its points have - and coordinates, therefore it is not suitable for our supremum concept at first. But we can simply "look at the set of all coordinates of the Mandelbrot set" and try to find its supremum. To put it more clearly: We would like to know how far up the black dots in the picture reach and are looking for the smallest upper bound. Which value it has exactly, however, is completely unclear at the first (and also at the second) look[2].

Die kleinste obere Schranke wird durch folgende zwei Eigenschaften charakterisiert:

  • ist obere Schranke von : Für jedes ist .
  • Jede obere Schranke von ist mindestens so groß wie : Gilt für alle , so gilt auch . Anders formuliert: Für jedes gibt es mindestens eine Zahl mit .

Das können wir als Definition des Supremums verwenden, da es offenbar die kleinste obere Schranke charakterisiert. Das Infimum wird analog als die größte untere Schranke definiert. Eine weitere Möglichkeit der Charakterisierung von Supremum und Infimum werden wir im Abschnitt „Suprema und Infima in Halbordnungen“ kennenlernen.}}

Definition of the Supremum and Infimum[Bearbeiten]

Das Supremum ist die kleinste obere Schranke einer Menge.

Die Definition des Supremums und des Infimums lautet:

Definition (Supremum)

Let be a subset of . The supremum of the set is the smallest upper bound of . The supremum is characterized by the following two properties:

  • For every it holds .
  • There is no number less than that is an upper bound of : For all there exists at least one number with .

Definition (Infimum)

Let be a subset of . The infimum of the set is the largest lower bound of . The infimum is characterized by the following two properties:

  • For every it holds .
  • No number larger than is a lower bound of : For all there exists at least one number with .

The Epsilon Definition[Bearbeiten]

In the second property in the definition of the supremum of the set , which is an element of the set , it says:

"Every number less than is not an upper bound of : For all there exists at least one number with .“

In mathematical literature and textbooks, authors often set with . This is a way to write the second propery of the supremum as a formal mathematical claim. Namely, we could replace the second property given above with the equivalent statement:

"For all there exists some with .“

Since both statements are equivalent and just differently worded, it is up to our discretion which variant we choose to use in proofs.


Question: What is the epsilon definition of the infimum?

is an infimum of if is a lower bound of and if for any there exists some such that holds.

Maximum and Minimum[Bearbeiten]

For the maximum and minimum we have the following well-known definitions:

Definition (Maximum)

Das Maximum einer Menge ist eine Zahl mit den folgenden zwei Eigenschaften:

  • .
  • Für alle ist .

Definition (Minimum)

Das Minimum einer Menge ist eine Zahl mit den folgenden zwei Eigenschaften:

  • .
  • Für alle ist .

Das Maximum ist stets Supremum der Menge. Sei nämlich Maximum einer Menge . Zum einen ist per Definition obere Schranke von . Zum anderen gibt es für alle mit ein mit , nämlich . Umgekehrt ist nicht jedes Supremum Maximum, wie wir oben an der Menge gesehen haben. Die Zahl ist zwar Supremum dieser Menge, aber kein Maximum. Analoges gilt für Minimum und Infimum.

Schreibweisen[Bearbeiten]

Schreibweise Bedeutung
Supremum von
Supremum von
Infimum von
Infimum von
Maximum von
Minimum von

Das Dualitätsprinzip[Bearbeiten]

Wir haben bereits in den Definitionen und in der obigen Erklärung gesehen, dass die Begriffe des Supremums und des Infimums analog zueinander betrachtet werden können. Der Grund liegt darin, dass bei Umkehrung der Ordnung auf den reellen Zahlen das Supremum zum Infimum wird und umgekehrt. Wir können nämlich eine neue Ordnung dadurch einführen, dass genau dann ist, wenn ist (wir spiegeln hier die reelle Zahlengerade an der Null). Bei dieser neuen Ordnung verhält sich das ursprüngliche Supremum wie ein Infimum und umgekehrt. Beide Ordnungen und haben dieselben ordnungstheoretischen Eigenschaften. Sie sind daher isomorph zueinander. Deshalb müssen auch die Eigenschaften von Supremum und Infimum bei umgekehrter Ordnung dieselben sein. Alles was wir in Zukunft für Suprema sagen, gilt in ähnlicher Weise auch für Infima und umgekehrt. Das Gleiche gilt folglich auch für Maximum und Minimum.

Example (Dualitätsprinzip)

Für alle ist . Analog ist für alle die Ungleichung erfüllt.

Existenz und Eindeutigkeit[Bearbeiten]

Wir haben bisher ganz selbstverständlich von dem Supremum gesprochen. Das klingt so, als ob es immer eines gäbe und als ob es immer eindeutig wäre. Der Verdacht liegt auch nahe: Wozu sollten wir uns die Mühe machen, den Begriff „Supremum“ überhaupt zu definieren, wenn er das Grundproblem des Maximums (nämlich oftmals gar nicht zu existieren) gar nicht lösen könnte? Was wäre der Vorteil des Supremums gegenüber dem Begriff der „oberen Schranke“, wenn auch das Supremum nicht eindeutig wäre? Intuitiv ist irgendwie klar, dass es unter allen oberen Schranken genau eine kleinste geben muss, aber bis jetzt haben wir das noch nicht streng mathematisch bewiesen.

Im folgenden Satz werden wir die Eindeutigkeit des Infimums und Supremums beweisen, also dass eine Menge höchstens ein Supremum und Infimum besitzen kann:

Theorem (Eindeutigkeit des Supremums und Infimums)

Eine Menge kann höchstens ein Supremum und höchstens ein Infimum besitzen.

Proof (Eindeutigkeit des Supremums und Infimums)

Wir können die Standardbeweismethode für Eindeutigkeit nutzen: Zunächst nehmen wir eine Menge an, die zwei Suprema und besitzt, und zeigen dann, dass ist. Die beiden Suprema haben folgende Eigenschaften:

  • und sind obere Schranken von .
  • Keine Zahl kleiner als und ist eine obere Schranke von .

Keine Zahl kleiner als ist obere Schranke von . Da eine obere Schranke von ist, kann nicht kleiner als sein und muss damit größer gleich sein. Analog ist . Aus und folgt . Der Beweis für die Eindeutigkeit des Infimums ist analog.

Mit dem Vollständigkeitsaxiom kann auch die Existenz des Supremums einer nach oben beschränkten nicht-leeren Teilmenge der reellen Zahlen bewiesen werden. Dies werden wir in diesem Kapitel jedoch nicht behandeln. Analog besitzt eine nach unten beschränkte nicht-leere Teilmenge der reellen Zahlen stets ein Infimum. Somit ist es tatsächlich so, dass Supremum und Infimum einer nach oben beschränkten und nicht-leeren Teilmenge der reellen Zahlen immer existieren und immer eindeutig sind. Deswegen dürfen wir beruhigt von dem Supremum sprechen.

Ausblick: Suprema und Infima in Halbordnungen [Bearbeiten]

Obige Definition für Suprema und Infima haben wir speziell für Mengen von reellen Zahlen eingeführt. Für eine „Analysis 1“-Vorlesung reicht diese Definition aus, weil wir hier nur Teilmengen von betrachten. Für spätere Vorlesungen, in denen wir uns auch mit echten Halbordnungen befassen werden, ist unsere bisherige Definition allerdings nicht ausreichend. Zur Erinnerung: Halbordnungen sind Ordnungsstrukturen, bei denen wir nicht zwangsweise zwei Paare von Objekten miteinander vergleichen können. In solchen Halbordnungen wird obige Definition von Supremum und Infimum nicht verwendet, weil mit ihr Suprema nicht eindeutig sind. Um weiterhin einen eindeutigen Supremumbegriff zu haben, wird für Halbordnungen definiert:

Definition (Supremum in Halbordnungen)

In halbgeordneten Mengen ist ein Element Supremum einer Menge , wenn gilt:

  • ist obere Schranke von : Für jedes ist .
  • Für jede andere obere Schranke von gilt:

Um zu zeigen, dass diese Definition eine sinnvolle Verallgemeinerung des Supremums auf Halbordnungen ist, müssen wir zeigen, dass beide Definitionen auf Teilmengen der reellen Zahlen übereinstimmen:

Theorem (Äquivalente Definition des Supremums)

Sei beliebig. Unsere Definition des Supremums lautet:

  • Für jedes ist .
  • Jede Zahl kleiner als ist keine obere Schranke von : Für alle gibt es mindestens eine Zahl mit .

Diese Definition ist äquivalent zur Definition des Supremums in Halbordnungen:

  • ist obere Schranke von : Für jedes ist .
  • Für jede andere obere Schranke von gilt:

Proof (Äquivalente Definition des Supremums)

Sei beliebig. Da die jeweils ersten beiden Eigenschaften identisch sind, muss nur noch die Äquivalenz der folgenden beiden Aussagen bewiesen werden:

  • Jede Zahl kleiner als ist keine obere Schranke von : Für alle gibt es mindestens eine Zahl mit .
  • Für jede andere obere Schranke von gilt .

Beide Aussagen formalisiert lauten:

Die Äquivalenz beider Aussagen können wir folgendermaßen zeigen: