Divergence to infinity: rules – Serlo

Aus Wikibooks
Zur Navigation springen Zur Suche springen
UnderCon icon.svg

Diese Seite ist noch im Entstehen und noch nicht offizieller Bestandteil des Buchs. Gib der Autorin / dem Autor Zeit, die Seite anzupassen!

In the last article, we mentioned that some rules for limit calculation carry through to improper convergent sequences, and some don't. For instance, if a sequence (improperly) converges to and a second sequence (properly) converges to , one cannot make any statement about the convergence of their product!

Exercise

Find examples for sequences and as above, such that

  1. where
  2. is bounded and diverges
  3. is unbounded, but does not converge improperly

Solution

Part 1: For instance, with and , there is , and

Part 2: For instance, with and , there is , and

Part 3: For instance, with and , there is , and

Part 4: For instance, with and , there is , and

Part 5: For instance, with and , there is , and is bounded and diverges

Part 6: For instance, with and , there is , and is unbounded, but does not converge improperly

Rules for computing limits of improperly converging sequences[Bearbeiten]

Which calculation rules for limits of convergent sequences can be carried over to improper convergence? The answer is: almost all of them, but only if certain conditions hold!

Product rule[Bearbeiten]

Suppose that is a sequence with . What will happen to the product  ? The case definitely causes trouble, meaning that we cannot make any statement about convergence or divergence of the product.

Case 1: . Intuitively, so we expect . This assertion only needs to be mathematically proven:

Let be given. Since we can find an with for all . Analogously, since there is an with for all . Whenever we therefore have

So, indeed .

Case 2: . Intuitively, so we expect . What we need to show for a mathematical proof is:

So let again be given. Since there is an with for all . Analogously, since there is an with for all . Now, for all we have

And indeed there is .

Case 3: . Intuitively, so we again make a guess . The proof could be done as the two examples above. However, this time we will vary it a bit, to make it not too boring:

Let be given. Since , for each there is an with for all . We set . Then there is : , which especially includes . Since there is some with for all . Now for we have

And hence .

Case 4: . Here, .

Exercise

Prove this.

Solution

We need to show:

So let be given. Since , we have that for any some exists with for all . Now, set . Then : , which especially includes . Since there is also an with for all . Now, for there is

And we obtain the desired result .

Those four cases can also be concluded into one statement. We introduce a practical extension of the real numbers: To the set , we add the elements which leads to the bigger set .

Theorem (Product rule for improperly convergent sequences)

Let be a real sequence with and a real sequence with . Then

Sum rule[Bearbeiten]

Let again be a sequence with . What can we say about the limit of a sum  ? For finite , the limit will stay unchanged, as intuitively . Similarly . The critical case is , as is not well-defined. In fact, this case does not allow for any statement about convergence or divergence of the sum . As an example,

  • For and there is .
  • For and there is .

We therefore exclude the case and consider all other cases:

Case 1: . We expect Mathematically, we need to prove:

Let be given. Since there is an with for all . Analogously, since there is an with for all . Hence, for all we have

And indeed .

Case 2: . We also expect . Mathematically, we need to prove:

Let be given. Since for each we can find an with for all . This includes the case . Hence, for all . Since there is also an with for all . Hence, for any we have

And we get the desired result .

Both cases can be concluded in a theorem:

Theorem (Sum rule for improperly convergent sequences)

Let be a real sequence with and be a real sequence with . Then

Inversion[Bearbeiten]

Auch die nächste Regel ist intuitiv vollkommen logisch. Ist eine Folge mit für alle und oder , so muss eine Nullfolge sein.

1.Fall: . Wir müssen zeigen

Sei vorgegeben. Wegen gibt es zu ein , so dass gilt . Damit gilt auch

Somit ist .

2.Fall: .

Exercise

Zeige, dass auch in diesem Fall eine Nullfolge ist.

Solution

Auch hier müssen wir zeigen:

Sei vorgegeben. Wegen gibt es zu ein , so dass gilt . Damit ist . Also gilt auch

Somit ist auch hier .

Wir halten das Ergebnis noch einmal fest:

Theorem (Inversionsregel 1 für uneigentlich konvergente Folgen)

Sei eine reelle Folge mit für alle und . Dann gilt

Verständnisfrage: Gilt im Allgemeinen auch die Rückrichtung der Inversionsregel, d.h. folgt aus immer oder ?

Nein, die Rückrichtung gilt im Allgemeinen nicht. Betrachte die Folge mit . Dann gilt , aber divergiert nicht bestimmt gegen oder .

Die Frage ist nun, wie wir die Voraussetzungen einschränken müssen, damit auch die Rückrichtung der Inversionsregel gilt. Bei dem Gegenbeispiel war das Problem, dass die Folge alternierend war. Daher gibt es unendlich viele Folgenglieder, die positiv sind, und unendlich viele Folgenglieder, die negativ sind. Fordern wir als zusätzliche Voraussetzung an , dass entweder nur endlich viele Folgenglieder negativ, oder nur endlich viele Folgenglieder positiv sind, so tritt das Problem nicht mehr auf.

1.Fall: Sei zunächst eine Folge mit , alle Folgenglieder seien und und fast alle Folgenglieder seien positiv. Dann ist es intuitiv klar, dass gilt. Zum Beweis müssen wir zeigen:

Sei gegeben. Da eine Nullfolge ist, gibt es zu ein mit für alle . Da fast alle Folgenglieder von positiv sind, gibt es ein mit für alle . Damit gilt nun für alle . Also ist .

2.Fall: Sei nun eine Folge mit , alle Folgenglieder seien und fast alle Folgenglieder seien negativ.

Exercise

Zeige, dass in diesem Fall gilt.

Solution

Hier müssen wir zeigen:

Sei gegeben. Da eine Nullfolge ist, gibt es zu ein mit für alle . Da fast alle Folgenglieder von negativ sind, gibt es ein mit für alle . Damit gilt nun , und daraus folgt für alle . Also ist .

Wir halten die beiden Fälle für die Rückrichtung der Inversionsregel noch einmal fest

Theorem (Inversionsregel 2 für uneigentlich konvergente Folgen)

Sei eine reelle Folge mit für alle und . Dann gilt

  • , falls für fast alle
  • , falls für fast alle

Example (Inversionsregel)

Im Kapitel Beispiele für Grenzwerte hatten wir gezeigt, dass für und eine Nullfolge ist. Für sind nun alle Folgenglieder nicht-negativ. Daher gilt nach der Inversionsregel

Analog gilt für :

Quotient rule[Bearbeiten]

Als nächstes wenden wir uns Quotientenfolgen mit uneigentlichen Grenzwerten zu. Seien also und Folgen mit für alle und die daraus gebildete Quotientenfolge.

Zunächst setzen wir voraus. Klar ist, dass wir die Fälle ausschließen müssen, denn hier können wir keine allgemeine Aussage über das Konvergenz-/Divergenzverhalten der Quotientenfolge machen. Sei daher . Dann gilt . Wir müssen dazu zeigen

Sei vorgegeben. Wegen ist beschränkt, d.h. es gibt ein mit für alle . Weiter gilt, wegen , nach der Inversionsregel . Also gibt es ein mit für alle . Damit gilt :

Somit ist .

Völlig analog gilt im Fall und ebenfalls .

Zusammen ergibt sich

Theorem (Quotientenregel 1 für uneigentlich konvergente Folgen)

Seien und reelle Folgen mit und . Dann gilt .

Nun setzen wir für die Zählerfolge fest: . Wieder müssen wir die Fälle ausschließen.

1.Fall: . Hier gilt . Zum Beweis haben wir zu zeigen:

Sei gegeben. Da gegen konvergiert, gibt es ein , so dass für alle . Wegen gibt es ein mit für alle . Damit gilt für alle :

Also ist .

2.Fall: und fast alle seien positiv. Hier gilt ebenfalls . Zum Beweis müssen wir erneut zeigen:

Sei gegeben. Da gegen konvergiert und fast alle Folgenglieder positiv sind, gibt es ein mit für alle . Wegen gibt es ein mit für alle . Damit gilt für alle :

Also ist .

Exercise

Zeige, dass in den Fällen und , und fast alle seien negativ, gilt:

Solution

1.Fall: . Wir zu zeigen:

Sei gegeben. Da gegen konvergiert, gibt es ein , so dass für alle . Wegen gibt es ein mit für alle . Damit gilt für alle :

Also ist .

2.Fall: und fast alle seien negativ. Wir müssen erneut zeigen:

Sei gegeben. Da gegen konvergiert und fast alle Folgenglieder negativ sind, gibt es ein mit für alle . Wegen gibt es ein mit für alle . Damit gilt für alle :

Also ist .

Zusammengefasst lautet die zweite Version der Quotientenregel

Theorem (Quotientenregel 2 für uneigentlich konvergente Folgen)

Seien und reelle Folgen mit .

  • Ist oder und fast alle , dann gilt .
  • Ist oder und fast alle , dann gilt .

Direct comparison[Bearbeiten]

Intuitively, if is given and some "smaller" sequence diverges to , then also the "bigger" must tend to . This should still hold true if " is bigger than " almost everywhere. Mathematically, we need to show

So let be given. Since there is an with for all . Since for all but finitely many there is an with for all . So indeed, .

We conclude this in a theorem:

Theorem (Direct comparison for sequences)

Let be a real sequence and be another sequence with for almost all and let . Then, .

Example (Direct comparison for sequences)

Take the sequence . For there is

In addition . So by direct comparison,

Of course, a similar statement holds true for and . Then also . This can easily seen by considering the sequences and .